Cancer

Cannabis versus Cancer: Scientific American

Scientific American reports: "Countless scientific studies have shown that medical cannabis offers palliative care benefits, including appetite stimulationpain relief and more. But early research indicates that cannabinoids can do so much more. Data is showing that medical marijuana has antitumor effects and may one day be used as a cancer treatment, not just as a drug to ease symptoms of the disease." Full article. 

Research: Anticancer effects of phytocannabinoids used with chemotherapy in leukaemia cells, International Journal of Oncology (May 27, 2017)

Early research is providing cancer patients with new hope.

From Abstract: "Phytocannabinoids possess anticancer activity when used alone, and a number have also been shown to combine favourably with each other in vitro in leukaemia cells to generate improved activity. We have investigated the effect of pairing cannabinoids and assessed their anticancer activity in cell line models. Those most effective were then used with the common anti-leukaemia drugs cytarabine and vincristine, and the effects of this combination therapy on cell death studied in vitro. Results show a number of cannabinoids could be paired together to generate an effect superior to that achieved if the components were used individually." Full study here.

Medical cannabis safer for elderly with chronic pain than opioids: European Pharmaceutical Review

Medical cannabis therapy can significantly reduce chronic pain in patients age 65 and older without adverse effects, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the Cannabis Clinical Research Institute at Soroka University Medical Center.

The new study found that cannabis therapy is safe and efficacious for elderly patients who are seeking to address cancer symptoms, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and other medical issues.

“While older patients represent a large and growing population of medical cannabis users, few studies have addressed how it affects this particular group, which also suffers from dementia, frequent falls, mobility problems, and hearing and visual impairments,” says Victor Novack, a Professor of Medicinein the BGU Faculty of Health Sciences (FOHS), and head of the Soroka Cannabis Clinical Research Institute. 

“After monitoring patients 65 and older for six months, we found medical cannabis treatment significantly relieves pain and improves quality of life for seniors with minimal side effects reported.” Read full article here and review research here.

Research: Simplified guidelines for prescribing medical cannabinoids in primary care, Canadian Family Physician

The new 2018 guideline, published in the official journal of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, suggests that clinicians could consider medical cannabinoids only for refractory neuropathic pain and refractory pain in palliative care, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and spasticity in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury after reasonable trials of standard therapies have failed.

Research: Cannabinoids used in sequence with chemotherapy are a more effective treatment for cancer, International Journal of Oncology (May 2017)

  • A 2017 study on cells from researchers at St. George’s University in London and published in the International Journal of Oncology suggests that using cannabinoids alongside chemotherapy may be a more effective treatment for killing cancer cells than using chemotherapy alone. Furthermore, this research suggests that using cannabinoids alongside chemotherapy could achieve the same anticancer effect with a lower dose of chemotherapy. Summary here.